Plenary Sessions

Plenary Session:

“O Ponto, a Letra e o Arco-íris”

 Irene Lucília Andrade

( Literary Writer and Artist Born in Madeira Island)

Irene Lucília Andrade (+ info sonn)
Abstract: (+ info. soon)
Plenary Session:

(Title to be announced soon)

Isabel Maria Fernandes Alves

(Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro e CEAUL, Portugal)
 
Isabel Maria Fernandes Alves – Teacher of Anglo-American Studies at the Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (Portugal) since 1988, and assistant professor of American Literature since 2000, she holds a Ph. D. on Willa Cather. For the past few years has been studying the relationship between literature and environment and has published essays on authors such as Willa Cather, Sarah Orne Jewett, Henry David Thoreau, Ruth Suckow, Barbara Kingsolver, Jamaica Kincaid, and Mary Oliver, among others. Her research is also focused on comparative literature and has published articles on Portuguese authors. She is a member of ASLE and EASLCE.
 Abstract: (+ info soon)
Plenary Session:

“LITERATURA E GEOGRAFIA, ARTE E CIÊNCIA: geograficidade, poesia e experiência”

Márcia Manir

(Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Brazil)

 

Márcia Manir (+ info soon)
+ info. here 
Abstract: (+ info. soon)

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Plenary Session:

Archipelago Aesthetics

May Joseph

(Pratt Institute, New York, USA)

MayJoseph

 May Joseph was born in Tanzania and is Professor of Global Studies in the Department of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute, New York. Her scholarly research combines critical cultural theory and environmental practice, and she has published widely on globalization, urbanism, performance and visual culture, including books on Fluid New York: Cosmopolitan Urbanism and the Green Imagination (Duke University Press, 2013); Nomadic Identities: The Performance of Citizenship (Minnesota, 1999), and the co-edited Performing Hybridity (Minnesota, 1999). Joseph is founder of the environmental collective Harmattan Theater and has dramaturged and directed Harmattan’s site specific outdoor productions, exploring the history of New York City through architecture, design, and environmentalism. Joseph’s artistic work includes Lisbon and cities in India, where she made a short film about the Yamuna River in Delhi, and is working on a site specific performance along the Fort Cochin seawall.
+ info. here

AbstractReclaiming a city’s archipelagic identity is becoming an increasingly urgent transformation for island cities whose identities were shaped by the car rather than the boat. The case of New York is a startling study in the dramatic rethinking of a bridge and tunnel logic towards a more archipelagic thinking.

New York City is now very much an archipelago in search of an aesthetic and political commitment towards understanding its archipelagic ecology. This is no easy task in the age of environmental defunding and catastrophe climate science denial. My talk will share some of the infrastructural rethinking as well as environmental redesign that is morphing the emerging archipelagic city of New York.

Plenary Session:

(Eco)cultural mapping and connecting to place: Island perspectives

Nancy Duxbury

(CES-Universidade de Coimbra;  Simon Fraser University Vancouver)

Nancy Duxbury, PhD, is a Senior Researcher at the Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal, and is a member of the European Expert Network on Culture. She is the Principal Investigator for a major three-year research and demonstration project on creative tourism in Portugal, entitled “CREATOUR: Creative Tourism Destination Development in Small Cities and Rural Areas” (2016-2019). This project involves five Portuguese research centres and 40 pilots, and aims to link the cultural and tourism sectors within a context of inclusive and sustainable local and regional development. Her past research has examined culture in local sustainable development; culture-based development models in smaller communities; and cultural mapping, which bridges insights from academic inquiry, community practice, and artistic approaches to understand and articulate place. She is co-editor of Animation of Public Space through the Arts: Toward More Sustainable Communities (published by Almedina in 2013), Cultural Mapping as Cultural Inquiry, and Culture and Sustainability in European Cities: Imagining Europolis (both published by Routledge in 2015). She was born in Canada, and lived on both the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts of the country before moving to Portugal in 2009. She currently splits her time between Coimbra and São Miguel Island, Azores.
+ info. here
Abstract: Inspired by a major ‘artistic community mapping’ project involving residents of 17 islands in the Salish Sea, on the Pacific coast of British Columbia, Canada, this presentation explores how (eco)cultural mapping can catalyze processes for actively connecting to place and deepening knowledge of a locality, as well as provide a platform for collective expression and action. It considers how these practices may link to issues of cultural sustainability and generativity while emphasizing place-based contextualization and the close intertwining of environmental and socio-cultural dimensions of place.Three developments within the interdisciplinary field of cultural mapping frame this discussion: a shift from documenting tangible cultural assets to articulating the plural meanings of places and their stories; an expanding scope in defining ‘culture’ within local mapping projects; and the growing presence of artistic approaches to cultural mapping, which are enriching perspectives and diversifying methods to understanding place. The presentation is also informed by the closely aligned practices of eco-cultural mapping, counter mapping, and community atlases; recent research on culture and sustainability; and current work on creative tourism in small communities and rural areas.Participatory (eco)cultural mapping projects have been conducted to articulate and make visible culturally important assets and place meanings, to capture elders’ knowledge and inform younger generations, to serve as a shared platform for discussion among different groups, and to guide collective decision-making and actions for future development. Typically these initiatives are focused on involving local residents (only); however, this presentation considers how both local residents and temporary visitors might contribute to building such pluralistic and expressive knowledge platforms.

Participatory (eco)cultural mapping projects have been conducted to articulate and make visible culturally important assets and place meanings, to capture elders’ knowledge and inform younger generations, to serve as a shared platform for discussion among different groups, and to guide collective decision-making and actions for future development. Typically these initiatives are focused on involving local residents (only); however, this presentation considers how both local residents and temporary visitors might contribute to building such pluralistic and expressive knowledge platforms.

Plenary Session:

(Title to be announced soon)

Sophia Perdikaris

(City University of New York/ Brooklyn College, New York, USA)

Sophia Perdikaris is an environmental archaeologist with a specialty in the analysis of animal remains from archaeological sites in the North Atlantic and the Caribbean. She is interested in people-environment interactions and how heritage work can inform sustainability questions for the future. Environmental sustainability is a challenge for every community, including communities in Antigua and Barbuda. Working toward sustainability means understanding human and environmental change over time: what is changing, how it is changing, why it is changing, and what we can do to mitigate change, adapt to change, or both. As a director of the Human Ecodynamics Research Center (CUNY Graduate Center) and director of the Barbuda Research Complex (Codrington, Barbuda, West Indies), she is focusing on a transdisciplinary approach to explore issues of sustainability projects combining the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and the arts in a collaborative research perspective that connects scientists, local communities, and youth. Her early work concentrated on the transition from the Viking Age to medieval times in northern Norway and how the early commercialization of the cod fisheries (AD 1200) affected the people and the economy of the area. She has been excavating in Norway for the last 12 years, in Iceland for seven years, and in Barbuda for six years, and takes students with her in the field to Barbuda.
 Abstract: (+ info soon)
Plenary Session:

(Title to be announced soon)

Teresa M. G. Jardim

(Visual Artist and Literary Writer born in Madeira Island)

 

Teresa M. G. Jardim is a visual artist and writer from Madeira island.
(+ info. soon)
 Abstract: (+ info soon)